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Prof. Ian McCausland
imccausland@sympatico.ca
Tel: 416-255-4994

2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002
Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2
Canada

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McCausland, Prof. Ian     (Easy Link: http://www.worldsci.org/people/Ian_McCausland)
Professor of Electrical Engineering (Retired)

Interests: Relativity
Nationality: Canadian
Age: 88
Born: Wednesday, April 10, 1929

Books:
2011A Scientific Adventure: Reflections on the Riddle of Relativity
1988The Relativity Question
1977The Dingle Affair
1973Einstein\'s Special Theory of Relativity: Right or Wrong?

Abstracts Online:
1999Anomalies in the History of Relativity
2008A Question of Relativity
2003The Einstein Mystique
1983Problems in Special Relativity
1990An Inconsistency in Special Relativity
1996The Solar Eclipse Observations of 1919
1996Dirac on Einstein and Lorentz
1980Binary Stars and the Velocity of Light
1995Public Perception
2012Reviewing the Riddle of Relativity

Event Attendence:
2015-03-28Finite Theory of the UniverseVideo Conference
2012-07-2519th Natural Philosophy Alliance ConferenceConference
2012-01-07New NPA Website Tutorial Video ConferenceVideo Conference
2010-11-06Weber's ElectrodynamicsVideo Conference
2010-06-19Time, Space, Motion, Metaphysics, and Natural PhilosophyVideo Conference
2009-10-17Instances of Relativistic Illogic (With a GPS Assist)Video Conference
2009-08-08Debate Einsteins Special Relativity Postulates True or FalseVideo Conference
2009-06-27Friendly Advice for DissidentsVideo Conference
2009-05-16The Twin Paradox: How To Win The DebateVideo Conference
1996-06-023rd Natural Philosophy Alliance ConferenceConference
1995-05-222nd (A) Natural Philosophy Alliance ConferenceConference

Biography

Ian McCausland was born in Lisbellaw, Northern Ireland.  He was for many years a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering (now the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering) at the University of Toronto, and is now Professor Emeritus. He holds B.Sc. (1949) and M.Sc. (1950) degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Queen's University of Belfast, Ph.D. (1958) in Electrical Engineering from the University of Toronto, and Ph.D. (1964) in Control Engineering from the University of Cambridge. He is the author of a textbook Introduction to Optimal Control (Wiley, 1969). He became actively involved in the critical study of relativity in 1972, and was a supporter of Professor Herbert Dingle for some years before his death in 1978. McCausland arranged for the posthumous publication of Dingle's last paper in Wireless World (October 1980). He subsequently attended courses in logic and philosophy of science at the University of Toronto, completed a major undergraduate program in philosophy, and graduated with a B.A. degree in 1991.  In recent years he has taken part in a long debate on the self-consistency of special relativity with Professor I. J. Good, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Statistics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; the debate is published in the pages of Physics Essays.

Good-McCausland Debate

All papers published in Physics Essays.

  1. I. McCausland: An Inconsistency in Special Relativity, Vol. 3, No. 2, 1990, pp. 176-7.
  2. I. J. Good: The Kinematics of Special Relativity, and Dingle's Fallacies, Vol. 4, No. 4, 1991, pp. 591-5.
  3. I. McCausland: A Reply to "The Kinematics of Special Relativity, and Dingle's Fallacies", Vol. 6, No. 1, 1993, pp. 127-8.
  4. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1994, pp. 436-441.
  5. I. McCausland: A Reply to "The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity", Vol. 9, No. 3, 1996, pp. 484-6.
  6. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, II, Vol. 10, No. 2, 1997, pp. 327-333.
  7. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, III, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1997, pp. 454-465.
  8. I. J. Good. The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, IV, Vol. 11, No. 2, 1998, pp. 248-263.
  9. I. J. Good: Erratum, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1999, p. 190.
  10. I. McCausland: On the Consistency or Inconsistency of Special Relativity, Vol. 12, No. 3, 1999, pp. 438-445.
  11. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, Part V(A), Vol. 16, No. 1, 2003, pp. 29-42.
  12. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, Part V(B), Vol. 16, No. 2, 2003, pp. 174-9.
  13. I. McCausland: The Persistent Problem of Special Relativity, Vol. 18, No. 4, 2005, pp. 530-532.
  14. I. J. Good: The Self-Consistency of the Kinematics of Special Relativity, Part VI. Einstein's Argument in Special Relativity Concerning "Time Travel" Is Substantially Correct After All; and Smoothed Polygons, Vol. 19, No. 3, 2006, pp. 430-433.
  15. I. McCausland, On the Inconsistency of Good's Argument Defending Special Relativity, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2009, pp. 81-82.

Other articles:

  • Proc. IEEE, V62, pp. 1398-1399 (1974).
  • "Science on the Defensive," Canadian Electrical Engineering Journal, V5, pp. 3-4 (Apr 1980).

Books by Prof. Ian McCausland



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The Relativity Question

by Prof. Ian McCausland

Pages: 116
Publisher: Ian McCausland
Year: 1988


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Description

The Relativity Question can be regarded as a continuation of the story begun in Herbert Dingle's dissident classic, Science at the Crossroads (1972).  It may be "the only reasonably comprehensive account of Professor Dingle's crusade against special relativity, by anyone other than himself.  Even then, much of the story is told in Professor Dingle's own words, in the form of letters written by him to various people, copies of which he sent to [the author] in hopes that they would eventually be published.  There are also some letters written by [or with] a collaborator, Mr. Mark Haymon...  Replies to many of these letters are also included, and most of the correspondence is presented without detailed comment from [the author].  If the presentation of the correspondence seems somewhat one-sided, part of the reason is that some of those to whom letters were written... did not reply, and some of those who did reply would not give permission to publish their letters." - From the Preface

In addition to the correspondence, Dr. McCausland also presents criticisms of the theory of relativity itself.  He details logical flaws in the arguments of Dingle's adversaries that can be understood by scientists and non-scientists alike.  From their own words we can witness their case falter and ultimately fail.



View count: 34690
A Scientific Adventure: Reflections on the Riddle of Relativity

by Prof. Ian McCausland

Pages: 260
Publisher: Apeiron
Year: 2011
ISBN: 978-0986492662

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Description

A Scientific Adventure continues the story of my collaboration with Herbert Dingle, and brings the story up to date by describing many of my activities in my forty-year adventure in studying and writing critically about relativity. The book draws attention to the unsatisfactory situation whereby many arguments defending relativity are accepted by almost all scientists in spite of numerous contradictions, and it includes a description of the published debate between the author and Professor Jack Good, an eminent mathematician. Although the debate was left unresolved by Good?s death in 2009, Good had conceded an error in an important part of his argument and had left his case in an unresolved state. An important feature of the book is the demonstration that a claim of an internal inconsistency in special relativity theory cannot be refuted by citing experimental support for the theory, because an inconsistent theory could match any experimental results whatever.

One of Dingle's criticisms of the special theory is presented in an appendix, with a commentary showing that a published attempt to refute the argument by Professor Good was not sound. Other appendices present some of my published papers on the topics discussed in the book.



View count: 45736
Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity: Right or Wrong?

by Prof. Ian McCausland

Pages: 17
Publisher: Ian McCausland
Year: 1973


View count: 39179
The Dingle Affair

by Prof. Ian McCausland

Pages: 13
Publisher: Ian McCausland
Year: 1977

Papers by Prof. Ian McCausland



Anomalies in the History of Relativity

(1999)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994



Journal of Scientific Exploration, Volume 13, No. 2, pp. 271-290

Abstract:

In November 1919 it was announced to the world that observations of a solar eclipse that occurred in May 1919 supported Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. That announcement was one of the most influential events of 20th-century science, since Einstein's instant rise to enormous fame arose directly from it. In spite of the confidence with which the announcement was made, however, it was later realized that the accuracy of the observations was insufficient to constitute a reliable confirmation of the phenomenon that was predicted. Furthermore, another of the formulas published in the general theory, for the variation in the perihelion of the planet Mercury, had already been derived by another scientist several years earlier using another method. In spite of the fact that the experimental evidence for relativity seems to have been very flimsy in 1919, Einstein's enormous fame has remained intact and his theory has ever since been held to be one of the highest achievements of human thought. The resulting deification of Einstein has had some unfortunate effects: critics of his theory are often dismissed as cranks, and the search for better theories has been inhibited. It is suggested that the announcement of the eclipse observations in 1919 was not a triumph of science as it is often portrayed, but rather an obstacle to objective consideration of alternatives.



A Question of Relativity

(2008)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994


Apeiron, Volume 15, No. 2, pp. 156-168

Abstract:

Professor Herbert Dingle was a long-time critic of the special theory of relativity, who believed for many years that the theory was self-contradictory. Although he was unsuccessful in persuading the scientific world of the inconsistency of the theory, his questions and arguments were not satisfactorily answered during his life. Now, thirty years after his death, the subject is of historical interest. This paper examines two main problems that have contributed to the confusion that still surrounds this issue. The first problem is the fact that some scientists answered Dingle's Question, which is explicitly about the special theory, by invoking the general theory. It is argued that, if there is a valid answer to Dingle's Question, it would have been valid if the same question had been asked in 1905 before the general theory appeared. The second problem is that many scientists have claimed that Dingle's thesis has been refuted by experiment, although experimental results cannot disprove the existence of an internal contradiction. An answer to Dingle's Question is still wanting.



The Einstein Mystique

(2003)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994



Journal of Scientific Exploration, Volume 17, No. 4, pp. 715-732

Abstract:

Albert Einstein's scientific career is studied, with the purpose of trying to explain why he became such a universally famous and revered person. Various events of the past century are considered, and their effects on his scientific and personal reputation. Some of the events studied are: the publication of the special and general theories of relativity, the 1919 solar eclipse and the famous meeting at which the results of the eclipse observations were announced, and Einstein's visit to the United States in 1921. After his death, many biographies of Einstein were written, both before and after the availability of further information that became available about his personal life after the deaths of Helen Dukas and Otto Nathan; some of these are discussed, including the strange story of what happened to Einstein's brain after his death. Celebrations of the centenary of his birth, the centenary of special relativity, and the centenary of the solar eclipse are also discussed. In spite of all the information that is available, the reasons for Einstein's great and enduring fame remain mysterious.



Problems in Special Relativity

(1983)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994



Wireless World, Volume Oct, pp. 63-65
Keywords: Special Relativity

Lookup: special relativity (125), relativity (390), special (175)

Abstract:

Arguments that have been used to defend the special theory of relativity against criticism contain many inconsistencies. These problems should be thoroughly and objectively examined by scientists and philosophers to attempt to ascertain the truth of the matter.



An Inconsistency in Special Relativity

(1990)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994



Physics Essays, Volume 3, No. 2, pp. 176-177

Abstract:

This note presents an argument based on Einstein's original paper on special relativity, showing that the theory reqires that each of the two clocks in uniform relativite motion actually works slower than the other. This shows an internal inconsistency in the special theory.



The Solar Eclipse Observations of 1919

(1996)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994

1996, 3rd Natural Philosophy Alliance Conference, Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Keywords: Solar Eclipse of 1919

Lookup: solar (24)




Dirac on Einstein and Lorentz

(1996)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994

1996, 3rd Natural Philosophy Alliance Conference, Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Keywords: Dirac, Einstein, Lorentz

Lookup: einstein (54), dirac (11), lorentz (73)




Binary Stars and the Velocity of Light

(1980)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994



Speculations in Science and Technology, Volume 3, No. 4, pp. 509-511
Keywords: Binary Stars, Speed of Light

Lookup: speed of light (35), binary stars (7), light (157), speed (58), stars (13), binary (12)

Abstract:

Some scientists, such as Fox and Moon and Spencer, have questioned the validity of some of the experimental evidence that is usually interpreted as supporting the second postulate of special relativity, the postulate that the velocity of light is independent of the velocity of its source. Moon and Spencer have shown that the introduction of a certain Riemannian metric can explain observations of binary stars without requiring the second postulate. The purpose of the present note is to suggest a new metric whlch appears to be an improvement over the one suggested by Moon and Spencer, and which makes their argument more convincing.



Public Perception

(1995)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994

1995, 2nd (A) Natural Philosophy Alliance Conference, Norman, OK, United States

Abstract:





Reviewing the Riddle of Relativity

(2012)

Prof. Ian McCausland
2111 Lake Shore Blvd West, Apt. 1002, Toronto, Ontario M8V 4B2, Canada; imccausland@sympatico.ca, 416-255-4994





Proceedings of the NPA, Volume 9, pp. 374-377

2012, 19th Natural Philosophy Alliance Conference, Albuquerque, NM, United States

Abstract:

I describe my collaboration with Professor Herbert Dingle in his campaign against Einstein's special theory of relativity, and my subsequent attempts to draw attention to the inadequate response by scientists to his criticisms. Our active collaboration started with the publication of Dingle's book Science at the Crossroads in 1972 and continued until his death in 1978. This paper celebrates the 40th anniversary of that book, and points out that the dogmatic adherence of scientists to the special theory has continued to make it difficult for honest and informed criticism to be heard. Two arguments against the special theory are presented, both of which a very distinguished mathematician tried to refute but failed.

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